Co-Founder, Product Designer & Developer | 2012 - 2013

JobCrush helped companies attract top talent by leveraging their “cultural media” for jobs marketing.

The initial idea for JobCrush centered around creative professionals tagging colleagues on projects they worked on. This process of attribution would build a “creative graph” wherein each piece of work was a visual node and proof of involvement. At moderate scale it would have been a valuable resource to make connections based on real experience. My team and I conducted a lot of market and user research (phone interviews and surveys) in an attempt to validate the idea. In the end it felt like this kind of graph had already been built at Behance, so we shifted our attention to the jobs marketing and discovery platform that JobCrush ultimately became.

JobCrush was a dual-sided platform for companies and talent in the tech/creative space. Companies were provided with a few key features that helped them present more than just vanilla job listings to potential hires. By inviting prospects to join their “Talent Community” passive candidates would receive news, work-life photos and openings via scheduled email. By promoting their unique culture, companies could connect with potential hires and make sure they were top-of-mind when the hunt for new jobs began. Based on our customer development work, we implemented several features we knew hiring managers were interested in. To illustrate how the complete system worked, I drew this simple diagram that helped us when pitching to potential stakeholders or clients.

Each company had a dashboard that connected a host of social networks to their account. So instead of redundantly uploading photos, they could just select what they wanted to publish on their JobCrush page and marketing emails. The emails also pulled in news and job openings automatically. Hiring managers had to do almost nothing to run a slick drip-marketing campaign aimed at their talent community.


Aside from company features, there was a complete browsing and search experience for talent. This was implemeted on the web (desktop and responsive) so that a cumbersome app download would not push bounce rates through the roof. Visual content was king for this product and my design catered to this need. Mortar board style feeds and minimal mobile interfaces kept the content front and center. JobCrush also showed users which companies they had contacts at via LinkedIn integration. There was an organic signup option along with the LinkedIn option. Persuading them to opt for LinkedIn during onboarding required some iteration to get right. In this case, clever copywriting won out over workflow design.